Monday, October 31, 2011

Charlotte at War: How Charlotte fared in America’s wars

During World War I, Charlotte’s national profile skyrocketed with the opening of Camp Greene, a huge army training base on the city’s west side. Recruits came from across the United States to prepare here to fight in the trenches of Belgium and France. That’s part of the fascinating but little-known history of Charlotte’s role in America’s wars. The wars that defined America have also shaped our city. Along with gold mining and trains, Charlotte was strongly impacted by war through the centuries, from the Indian Wars to the war in Afghanistan. In honor of Veteran’s Day, popular history speaker David Erdman, a Charlotte lawyer, returns to The Duke Mansion for a fast-paced, picture-filled presentation on this hidden part of Charlotte’s history. Join us for “Charlotte at War” on Sunday, November 6, 3 pm at The Duke Mansion. The talk is free but reservations are required. To reserve your spot, call 704-714-4445 or email “Charlotte at War” is part of the Explore History! Series from The Duke Mansion ( and Levine Museum of the New South (

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Haunted Mansion Costume Party

We're so excited about our Haunted Mansion Costume Party on Friday, October 28, from 6:30 pm until the witching hour. It's a benefit for The Mansion. Tickets are $125 ($75 of that is tax-deductible). Support The Mansion while enjoying the best Halloween party in town. Groove to music from Bad Daddies. Bid on jewelry, trips, Panthers tickets and more at our auction. And of course, sink your fangs into the incredible food from Chef Harrison! Here's more on the menu. See you there!
Butler Passed Hors d’Oeurves Epidermis Crostini Prosciutto Crostini with Lemony Fennel Slaw Fried Eye Balls Risotto stuffed with Oysters Severed Finger Treats Grilled Bratwurst with Sauerkraut and Apple Slices Reception Menu Sinister Soup Sips Pumpkin Squash Soup with Gruyere Croutons and Pumpkin Seed Oil Served in the “Great Pumpkin” Fruits of the Haunted Forest Salads Arugula Salad with Goat Cheese, Cranberries and Candied Pecans Balsamic Fig Dressing Turkey “Ghoul”ash with Paprika Sauce Served over Green Beans and Egg Noodles Rest in “Peas” Scallops Baked Sea Scallops with Parsley Walnut Breadcrumb Crust Served over Pea Risotto and Cremini Mushrooms Stake of Steaks Beef Shortribs, Butter Roasted Brussel Sprouts and Bacon Skewers Dessert Station Cinnamon Sugar Pumpkin Spice Donuts Mint Chocolate Chip Cookies Lemon Meringue Ghosts And Late Night Snacks

Monday, August 1, 2011

Friday Night Cocktails

Drop By The Duke Mansion For Friday Summer Cocktails Looking for a beautiful setting to meet friends, enjoy a drink and kick off your weekend? Come to The Duke Mansion for summer cocktails on Friday, August, 5 and Friday, September 16. From 5:30 to 7 pm on each date, we’ll offer a cash bar and tastes from Executive Chef Harrison Booth to enjoy in the spectacular setting of The Duke Mansion. Meet your friends in the mansion’s gardens, or if the weather isn’t kind, inside the mansion with its marble floors and exquisite antiques. Reserve your spot by calling 704/714-4448 or emailing The Duke Mansion is located at 400 Hermitage Road in Myers Park. For more about staying at The Duke Mansion or booking a wedding or special event, visit

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

What’s Vanishing and What’s Saved?

Charlotte - Mecklenburg County is quickly losing its farms and farm life. But some elements of our rural landscape have been preserved, including fascinating ruins of plantation homes and slave cemeteries that shed light on our past. What rural landmarks have we successfully saved in Charlotte? What have we lost? And what are the fights going on now? Join Dr. Dan Morrill, consulting director of Charlotte Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission, for a free presentation and film about our rural preservation successes and challenges. “Mecklenburg County’s Rural Landscape: What’s Vanishing and What’s Saved?” will take place on Sunday, May 15, 3 pm, at The Duke Mansion, 400 Hermitage Road in Charlotte. The event is free but reservations are required. To reserve your spot, call 704/714-4448 or email Explore evocative and imposing ruins, including the Robinson Rock House ruin, a former 18th century house built in the style of the Hezekiah Alexander House. Discover plantation homes such as Holly Bend on the Catawba River and historic cemeteries, including the Alexander Slave Cemetery in the Mallard Creek community. Hear the stories behind the headlines of efforts to save the Dr. George E. Davis House at Johnson C. Smith University, the Davis Brothers Store near Huntersville, and the Piedmont and Northern Railway Station in the Thrift community. “Mecklenburg County’s Rural Landscape: What’s Vanishing and What's Saved? is part of the Explore History! sponsored by Levine Museum of the New South ( and The Duke Mansion ( .

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Ever wonder what Charlotte was like 100 years ago? Come find out!

WHAT DID CHARLOTTE LOOK LIKE 100 YEARS AGO? SEE IT DURING FREE PROGRAM AT THE DUKE MANSION Charlotte - James B. Duke was one of North Carolina’s towering figures in the early 20th century. Many of his lasting legacies, including Duke Power Company, Duke University and The Duke Endowment, began when Duke and his family lived at The Duke Mansion, now a historic bed-and-breakfast inn and meeting place in Myers Park. What did Charlotte look like when Duke walked and drove these roads? How did Duke, one of the world’s richest men at that time, affect the landscape and the city with his purchases of land along the Catawba River? Join us on Sunday, March 20 at 3 pm for “Mr. Duke’s Charlotte,” a free presentation at The Duke Mansion, 400 Hermitage Road in Charlotte, featuring popular Charlotte history speaker David Erdman. Erdman will show dozens of photos of Charlotte as it appeared when James “Buck” Duke lived here around the turn of the last century. Enjoy an afternoon set in the streets of old Charlotte, plus photos of Duke’s innovative dams and his “Interurban” transit system that served the city. Though born poor in Durham, Duke dramatically grew the tobacco company his father started. He diversified his tobacco investments into manufacturing textiles, which led him to invest in electric generation to power the textile mills. More than 100 years later, Duke Energy is still headquartered in Charlotte and is among the largest power-generating companies in the U.S. Questions about the presentation? Call The Duke Mansion at 704/714-4400. “Mr. Duke’s Charlotte” is part of the Explore History! Series, presented by Levine Museum of the New South ( and The Duke Mansion ( .

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Electrifying the Carolinas: the Personal Story

A century ago, Charlotte emerged as a national leader in the new technology of electricity. WS Lee was the pioneering engineer for what is now Duke Energy. Members of the Lee family will share never-heard-before stories about towering figures from Charlotte’s past. Bill Williamson will talk about his grandfather WS Lee, who worked with James Buchanan Duke, owner of The Duke Mansion and founder of Duke University. States Lee will remember his father, Bill Lee, one of the iconic leaders not only of Duke Energy but of Charlotte - and for whom The Lee Institute is named. Lisa Lee Morgan, part of the new generation of the family, will talk about her involvement in green and renewable energy -- key elements of the field today. Energy is a core reason for Charlotte’s economic development in the 20th century and an essential focus for future economic growth. Discover more about Charlotte through this unique perspective. The afternoon will be hosted by Levine Museum of the New South historian Dr. Tom Hanchett. For more information, call 704.714. 4400. Join us for a personal look at William States Lee and Bill Lee by members of the Lee family and a conversation about the future of energy. Come hear about this important history at the Duke Mansion on Sunday November 14th, at 3pm.

Thursday, October 21, 2010

In Honor of Charlotte's Veterans

From World War II to Iraq: Charlotte's Veterans Look Back CPCC historian Gary Ritter screens selections from his documentary on Charlotte-area veterans from WWII to the present, followed by a discussion with veterans interviewed in the documentary. They'll describe their experiences at war and returning home, and how what happened was so different from what they expected. Our country's reactions to war have varied greatly from World War II to Iraq and Afghanistan. Share a fascinating and moving afternoon with local veterans who have seen war firsthand and survived attacks, ship explosions, and other disasters to share their stories with us. Ritter, a history teacher at CPCC, explores the past regularly as host of “Trail of History” on Central Piedmont Community College TV (Channel 17 on Time-Warner Cable).

When: Sunday, November 7, 3:00 pm

Where: The Duke Mansion, 400 Hermitage Road in Charlotte.

This event is free. Questions? Call 704/714-4400.

“From World War II to Iraq: Charlotte’s Veterans Look Back” is part of the Explore History! Series, presented by Levine Museum of the New South and The Duke Mansion.